Tag Archives: calcium

Healthy Spine Tips From Your Mother

We know you can still hear it like it was just yesterday – your mom advising (not nagging) you to do certain things while you were growing up. If you don’t eat your vegetables, no dessert! No coffee – it will stunt your growth. If you keep making that face it will get frozen like that.

Well, your mother probably had some great advice for a healthy spine, so we hope you were paying attention. We’re almost certain everyone has heard these two pieces of advice at least once in their life. The good news is they can genuinely help you maintain a healthy spine.

So, this blog goes out to all of the moms out there. Thank you for caring enough to let us know what’s good for us.

Stop slouching!

We’re sure you’ve heard various versions of this throughout your life, from stop slouching to sit up straight. It turns out your mother was just trying to teach you correct posture.

You may be thinking that good posture isn’t very important. Why does it matter if you aren’t sitting up straight all of the time? This may surprise you but when it comes to maintaining good health, good posture is right up there with eating well, regular exercise, and getting enough sleep.

Since posture is a learned behavior, it’s important to focus on it early in life. Children with poor posture are more likely to develop back pain and other conditions of the spine as they age. Children with poor posture are more likely to develop back pain as they age. Click To Tweet

Drink your milk!

Was milk a staple at your table while you were growing up? We sure hope so. Turns out your mom knew what she was talking about – children do need calcium to build strong bones.

Below is the recommended daily intake of calcium for children of all ages.

  • 1 to 3 years old — 700 milligrams of calcium daily
  • 4 to 8 years old — 1,000 milligrams of calcium daily
  • 9 to 18 years old — 1,300 milligrams of calcium daily

If children consistently don’t get their recommended daily intake of calcium, they are at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis as they age because calcium is vital to developing bone mass. Children need calcium to develop bone mass. Click To Tweet
If you received these healthy spine tips while you were growing up, it looks like you have another reason to thank your mother for this Mother’s Day. So, among all of the other things you have to thank your mom for this weekend, don’t forget to thank her for caring about your spine health before you even knew you had to.

Calcium: The Key To A Healthy Spine

When you were younger, did your mom urge you to drink your milk for strong bones? She wasn’t wrong in doing so. Milk is an excellent source of calcium, with an 8 ounce serving containing about 300 milligrams.

Calcium is a key nutrient to many of your body’s functions. It supports your bone mass, heart, blood, muscles, and nerves. Calcium is absolutely necessary to maintain a healthy spine.

Sadly, it’s estimated that 70% of people aren’t getting enough calcium in their diet. When your body doesn’t get enough calcium, it steals the calcium from your bones, making them more susceptible to fractures.70% of people aren’t getting enough calcium in their diet. Click To Tweet

If you consistently don’t get enough calcium over a period of years, you’re much more likely to develop osteoporosis, a condition that affects more than 44 million people in the US over the age of 50. Osteoporosis is characterized by loss of bone mass or bone mass that has become increasingly brittle.

There are two main components to maintaining strong bones and a healthy spine: reach the recommended intake of calcium every day and consume foods that help with the absorption of calcium.

Not sure how much calcium you should be consuming? See below, the recommended daily intake of calcium varies by age.

  • Adults 25-50 years old: 1,000 milligrams per day with 400 i.u. of Vitamin D
  • Adults 50+ years old: 1,500 milligrams per day with 400-800 i.u. of Vitamin D

It is important to note that consuming more than 2,000 milligrams of calcium per day can be harmful to your kidneys and can cause kidney stones to form.

Getting Calcium Through Your Diet

It is entirely possible to consume the recommended amount of calcium per day without the need for supplements. Dairy products, especially milk, are rich in calcium, as well as dark green leafy vegetables, beans, and peas.

Vitamin D helps your body with the absorption of calcium and, unfortunately, is only naturally found in a couple of foods, including egg yolks and certain fatty fish. However, many foods like milk and cereal have been fortified with the vitamin to make reaching your daily intake easier.
While it may be easy to waive off concern about your calcium intake for later in life, for your bones’ sake it’s important to consistently get enough calcium from an early age. If you have any additional questions on how to maintain a healthy spine, please use our previous blogs as a resource and register for our monthly newsletter.